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20130126
20130203
STATION
MSNBC 15
MSNBCW 15
CSPAN 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
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English 40
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam. if it's carried out, i will resist it. in march 2008 you said, quote, here the term quagmire could apply. >> what are these, the fulbright hearings all over again? i lived through them. and this guy is going back into some "last year at marienbad" kind of weird 1970s movie where you go back into the past that never even happened. why is he fighting hagel over vietnam? >> well, it's interesting because he's ostensibly fighting with him over iraq, but it immediately becomes over vietnam. he seems to be mad that hagel took issue with him about iraq and compared it to vietnam being the big blunder, which, of course, mccain and hagel both served in. you know, when mccain talks about iraq, all he wants to talk about is from the surge on. it's as if everything before that didn't happen and didn't count, and we can still debate whether the surge worked or not, but the bigger issue is whether iraq was as bad as vietnam, and he doesn't want to have that argument. >> here is mccain sinking his teeth into hagel's ankle here, and he w
he is going to give his manifesto on what republican foreign policy should be. that's going to be next week on ronald reagan's birthday, rand paul. but, you know, it's fitting, because we're coming up on reagan's birthday. and did you hear about the horrible obama muslim marxist thing about his kenyan home? did you hear? >> this is one wall that probably shouldn't be torn down. this apartment building used to be the home of a young ronald reagan. it was denied landmark status, and the university of chicago is ready to demolish it. the university is also trying to become the site of president obama's presidential library. that's drawing strong concerns the university might turn president reagan's former house into a parking lot for an obama library. >> did you hear about that? chicago close ties with the obamas, all of them, tearing down ronald reagan's boyhood home in order to make a parking lot for barack obama's presidential library. did you hear? did you hear? see, here it is on drudge. reagan's home could become parking lot for obama library. here it is on something call
a nominee tries to disavow his past positions on virtually every foreign policy issues all at the same time it raises serious questions. >> if hagel is confirmed by a strict party vote, how will it affect his relationship with republicans in congress? >> it sticks that he went from being a loyal republican to somebody who frankly took a differently point of view. he didn't endorse president obama, but he traveled with him and now prepared to be his secretary of defense. they kind of recent the fact that they think he is going to the other side. that said when he is in the pentagon and controls the military in that capacity, they will have to deal with him and have the same interest in common. both parties want to keep the u.s. strong and safe and chuck hagel has been through worse. believe me, he has seen much more incoming than at that hearing. >> republican strategist, good to see you. thank you. >> good to see you. >> still ahead on the saturday afternoon, the latest on the scandal around the top u.s. senator. first, on this date, an announcement that led to the moment so many had been c
. was that a mistake? >> i don't think that was a mistake. if you look at the overarching ark of our foreign policy, democrats had a sizeable advantage over republicans on the issues of foreign policy and keeping us safe. hillary clinton played a large role in that. if you look at -- i agree with you on the arab spring. got only knows what that is going to turn into. if you look at getting rid of gadhafi, and a large role in whether or not she runs for president because americans don't pay that much attention to foreign policy. >> if she's healthy, given the blood cloth and concussion, if she's healthy, do you think there's any doubt that she's still thinking about being the first woman as president of the united states? >> i have no idea what is in her head. she's certainly a strong institution of the democratic party, certainly stronger than joe biden does. the foreign policy will loom large. we'll ask the question, so what did the obama administration's afghanistan surge accomplish exactly? they sent tens and thousands of additional troops, spent a lot of money. we are going to be out of afghani
. >> cenk: will it have ramifications for israel's foreign policies especially with iran. >> the whole region is in turmoil, as we know. so the challenges to israel and to the entire mildews is front and center and will be on the agenda. these elections were in a strange way about coalition of israel. >> cenk: help me make sense of them. israel must at least get rid of the palestinians and put a frequence between us. how do you read that. >> i can't vouch for the quote but there is a desire and consensus to create a two-state solution, two states for two peoples. that consensus has been enduring for several years now and any israeli government will reflect that in the call political politically and officially is to reenter negotiations discussing and reinstating two-states. >> cenk: quote, it may be true that the humane thing is to remove the roadblocks and checkpoints, to stop the occupation immediately to, enable the palestinians freedom of movement of the territories and to tear down the bloody inhumane wall, to promise human rights to every individual. it's just that i will end up
there? i mean, vietnam has been sort of major thing, impacting american foreign policy for decades and obama administration first post-vietnam administration among democrats. not vietnam people and bringing it back in to the equation so what impact do you think vietnam will have on us going forward? >> i think if you look at his prepared statements, or the statements he delivered this morning, he said his view on the circumstances that should guide deploying troops to harm's way, to combat should be very, very specific and very, very carefully thought out. and i think that's a philosophy that's very much grounded in his experience as a combat veteran, as an enlisted soldier who saw combat and the reality of war. so i think, you know, i think from that perspective, that outlook is likely to shape how he conducts the afghan draw down, what advice to the white house about how quickly to pull troops and any future engagements across the world in places such as africa, elsewhere in the middle east, where you're seeing some troubles emerge and some calls for a greater u.s. intervention.
, as it should, and must for us to be effective in our foreign policy and for the assurance of our own security and our own interests. >> well, thank you, and thank you for your service. good luck. i know you're going to continue this in an academic context, and this is an issue that is still going to be very much pafsh your life and your work. >> thanks, andrea. >> thank you. >> the global challenges that await our next secretary of state, and you may have noticed that i'm wearing red today. joining women and men across the country and all throughout nbc and msnbc in support of the american heart association's national wear red day for women's heart health. heart disease is the number one killer of women in america, but for many it can be prevented by eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, not smoke, and visiting your doctor. hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! wow. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy. sfwlimplt john kerry will be sw
country looks like in the foreign policy world for the next 25 years. maybe more than any other secretary of state and defense in a long time because clearly the president is ready to rethink our strategy, this leading from behind strategy has not been the strategy of the country for a generation. but it looks like that's where the president wants to go, and frankly, it looks like that's where senator hagel would want to join him. >> are you a definite no vote on chuck hagel? >> yeah, i think i am. i say i think i am because i haven't announced that until now. but i've thought about this a lot since yesterday. i want to give the president the benefit of the doubt in who he can bring to his cabinet with him and who can join him in the cabinet. but in this job, at this time, things like the -- senator hagel's comments on containment. i think he really does believe, based on his statements yesterday, even though he backed away from them later, that we could contain a nuclear iran. i don't think we could contain a nuclear iran. i think it's too dangerous for us to try that. and so i will be v
correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy plunder in th ee vietnam. correct or incorrect. the question is were you right or wrong? i would like an answer if you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate? >> well, i'm not going to give you a -- a yes or no answer. >> name one person in your opinion who is intimidated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate? >> well, first -- >> name one. >> i don't know. >> well, why would you say it? >> i didn't have in mind a specific person. >> hmm. so, steve, how much was this politics and how much was this genuine, you know, policy concern? >> well, i think it was politics and policy and third, and i think it was personal. john mccain was the author of the surge of troops to iraq at the end of the administration, pushed it hard, took a lot of heat, including from the right. he takes it personal when chuck hagel calls it the bigst debacle since vietnam. and senator hagel dodging the question on whether he agreed with the same statement. hag mccain was getting testy and hagel was d
on israel yesterday. it is a huge foreign-policy issue for the. they happen to be in the middle of an environment that is unsettled and without clear paths forward. it is a core interest of the united states. again, it is a scenario where politicians feel strongly and american voters feel extremely strongly. there were some differences of opinion but got explored yesterday. again, that is part of the point of the hearing process -- of a confirmation progress -- process, getting into areas where people have concerns. host: one of the exchanges about israel, democrat from rhode island. >> interviews and speeches, i have always said i am a supporter of israel. in some cases, i have said a -- i am a strong supporter. i think it is in my book that we have a special relationship with israel. we always have. so i have never voted against israel ever in the 12 years i was in the senate. additional supplemental appropriations, the record is very clear. i might add, as long as we're on the subject, -- senator mel -- nelson may have a clear view of this, there have been a couple of recent
or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no. >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous -- >> senator hagel, the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like the answer whether you are right or wrong and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. >> so it feels like the senator is still fighting the iraq war there. who do you think, alice, looks worse in the exchange between the two men? >> well, clearly hagel. he couldn't put up a good defense for his position in that particular area. this is one area where he just clearly didn't understand what his record was. he first was for the iraq war and then he was opposed to the iraq surge, saying it was a terrible blunder on the part of the u.s. when in fact it worked. he also had trouble answering questions about where he stands with israel. he has failed repeatedly in the past senator to show solidarity with our greatest friend and a
are not great because of the policies of the turkish government both internally and in the broader region interfering with the peace process, turning against israel. but their economic policies have been very receptive to foreign in vetment. a very free market government even though it is islamist in its social policy. kind of a mixed situation. i think the turmoil in syria, the risk, the threat of iran all make a very complex situation with historical i think that is tensions one of the reasons in the absence of a clear and firm american policy why there is -- there is so much turmoil and so much risk. >> greta: is turkey sort of our proxy in terms of helping the rebels in syria? >> well, i think because there are so many refugees inside turkey who need humanitarian assistance that those refugee camps also provide r and r bases for the opposition in syria and as just as a logistical matter i think the turks don't want the assad regime to continue but they are worried that the opposition does contain substantial terrorist elements including al-qaeda. one of these things where it is like c
and millions of people around the world, you have left a profoundly positive mark on american foreign policy, and you have done enormous but for all of us and for the country we served. we will miss you deeply, but none of us -- [applause] but none of us will ever forget your extraordinary leadership, and each of us will always be deeply proud to say that we served in hillary clinton's state department. [cheers and applause] and so now it's my great honor to introduce one last time, the 67 the secretary of state of the united states for america, hillary rodham clinton. [cheers and applause] >> oh. thank you. thank you. oh. well, just, all of you, the people i have been honored to serve and lead and work with over the last four years, is an incredible experience. when i came in to this building as secretary of state four years ago, and received such a warm welcome, i knew there was something really special about this place, and that having the honor to lead at the state department and usaid would be unique and singular, exciting and challenging. it has been all of those things and so much mor
't usually think of as economic policy. immigration reform. i want to give you a few facts about immigrants and the american economy. first, about a tenth of the population is foreign-born, but more than a quarter of business started had a foreign-born owner. in silicon valley, half of all tech starts had a foreign-born owner. right now, about half of the doctors working in science and technology in america are foreign-born. immigrants are 30% more likely to get new businesses and three times more likely to file patents than their counterparts, on average, they tend to lift the american wages. the case is made by way of analogy. everybody gets, aging economies with low birth rates are in trouble. immigration is essential the importing of new workers, like raising the birth rate. but easier, because the newcomers are able to work immediately. you don't have to teach them to walk or eat with a fork. and in the u.s., they have an unusually amount to gain from the immigration, because when it comes to the global draft, we almost always get the first round picks. we do if we want them, and we ma
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)